How to Install WordPress on Ubuntu 17

WordPress is a commonly known and popular content management system (CMS), which means it is an application used to create and modify digitally created content. While WordPress has become the most popular option among users, many CMS feature similar features, such as search engine optimized web addresses, integrated help functions, compliance with accessibility requirements and more.

WordPress and other CMS also reduce the knowledge needed to create content, since they remove the code-from-scratch mentality of traditional websites. CMS also allows users to create a simple, unified feel across multiple pages, manage user permissions easily, and even save and revert to previous versions.

Getting Started

Before we jump into how to install WordPress, you need to make sure you’ve acquired at least one node, hosted on a cloud server or a dedicated server. This node will need to have Linux Ubuntu 17.04 LTS installed.

For this installation, you also need to ensure Secure Shell (SSH) root access is setup for your server. If you’re unfamiliar, SSH is a particular network protocol that’s used when executing services over an unsecured network. When using SSH, the implemented services are performed securely even without a secure network.

Tutorial

Installing WordPress

After setting up your cloud or dedicated server node, installing Ubuntu 17.04 LTS and confirming that you have SSH root access, it’s time to learn how to install WordPress on your node.

The first step in almost any successful installation is confirming that your software, or in this case server, is up to date. We’re going to verify that your server is running the most recent version of its’ software and that any necessary repositories are current:
apt-get update && apt-get upgrade -y

Once we’ve confirmed our server is updated, we need to go through the steps to create a functional LAMP setup, which means installing Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. As we’ve already verified we have Linux Ubuntu 17.04 LTS installed, we’re going to proceed with installing Apache.

Installing Apache2

The following commands will allow you to gather the necessary repositories for the Apache2 installation:
apt-get install apache2 -y

After allowing the Apache2 installation scripts to finish processing, we need to confirm that the Apache2 service is correctly installed, running properly, and enabled at startup:
systemctl status apache2.service
systemctl enable apache2.service

If you encounter an issue with Apache2 not currently running, it may be started with the following command:
systemctl start apache2.service

Installing MySQL Server

We’ve confirmed Apache2 is installed and running, so it’s time to proceed with the MySQL server setup:
apt-get install mysql-server mysql-client -y

While you proceed with the MySQL server installation process, you will receive a prompt for the MySQL root password. Please make sure you save this password someplace safe since you will need it later during the setup.

Once the installation of the MySQL server has completed, you will want to make sure you secure the server using the following command:
mysql_secure_installation

Make sure to follow the prompts you receive, using the below answers to complete each prompt:

Enter password for user root: ENTER ROOT PASSWORD
Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No: n
Change the password for root ? n
Remove anonymous users? y
Disallow root login remotely? y
Remove test database and access to it? y
Reload privilege tables now? y

Similar to the Apache2 setup, we need to confirm that MySQL is running and ensure that MySQL is setup to start on boot:
systemctl status mysql.service
systemctl enable mysql.service

Now that the Apache2 and MySQL server is installed on your node, it’s time to configure your MySQL credentials for the future WordPress setup. This step will require your MySQL root password from a few steps earlier:
mysql -u root -p

After signing into your MySQL instance, you need to create the wordpressdb database using the following command:
mysql> CREATE DATABASE wordpressdb;

Once created, run the following command to create a new user named “wpuser” with a new password. Then grant that user access to the wordpressdb database. During setup, it’s important to replace “type_new_password_here” with your chosen password:
mysql> GRANT ALL ON wordpressdb.* TO 'wpuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'type_new_password_here';

When your new user has been created, it’s important to reload the privileges for MySQL before leaving the console:
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> exit

Installing PHP and Related Modules

We’ve completed the Apache2 and MySQL installations, so it’s time to proceed with installing PHP. Utilizing the below command, initiate the PHP installation:
apt-get install php libapache2-mod-php php-mysql php-curl php-gd php-pear php-imagick php-imap php-mcrypt php-recode php-tidy php-xmlrpc wget -y

Setting Up WordPress

Now that we’ve finished installing Apache2, MySQL, and PHP, it’s time to install the latest version of WordPress to your server:
cd /tmp/ && wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

Once this completes, we need to extract the archive and then install the extracted archive under the apache vhost folder:
tar -xzvf latest.tar.gz
cp -R wordpress/* /var/www/html

After installing the extracted archive, it’s important to remove the default index page from Apache2:
rm -rf /var/www/html/index.html

Configuring WordPress

We’re getting close to finalizing your WordPress setup. Now we will copy the default configuration file example that’s provided by WordPress:

Once you’ve copied the default configuration file, you need to edit it to match the below setup:
nano /var/www/html/wp-config.php

According to what was created in the MySQL setup earlier, these are the areas that need modification:
define(‘DB_NAME’ => The database name we have created for this purpose, in our case: wordpressdb

define(‘DB_USER’ => The database user we have created to access this wordpressdb database

define(‘DB_PASSWORD’ => The database password we have created for this user (during: mysql> GRANT ALL ON wordpressdb.* TO ‘wpuser’@’localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘type_new_password_here’; )

// ** MySQL settings - You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define('DB_NAME', 'wordpressdb');
/** MySQL database username */
define('DB_USER', 'wpuser');
/** MySQL database password */
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'type_new_password_here');
/** MySQL hostname */
define('DB_HOST', 'localhost');
/** Database Charset to use in creating database tables. */
define('DB_CHARSET', 'utf8');
/** The Database Collate type. Don't change this if in doubt. */
define('DB_COLLATE', '');

Then you may save and close the editor.

Now that you’ve edited the WordPress config file with new settings, it’s time to change the Apache2 directory permissions and enable Apache-Modules, which allows WordPress to function properly:
chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www/html/
chmod -R 755 /var/www/html/
a2enmod headers
a2enmod rewrite
a2enmod env
a2enmod dir
a2enmod mime

Once the permissions have been changed and modules enabled, it’s time to restart Apache2:
systemctl restart apache2

Final Steps

The server part of your setup is complete. Now you’ll open your internet browser and access your server’s IP address.

For example, if the IP address for your server were 1.2.3.4, then you would open your browser and go to the following link: http://1.2.3.4

You will see the WordPress default setup page at this point, prompting you for the language of your WordPress setup and then prompting you to create an administrative account.

Wordpress-Install

Congratulations! You’ve just completed your WordPress setup on Ubuntu 17.04 LTS.

Conclusion

You’ve successfully moved through every step necessary to install WordPress on your dedicated node running Ubuntu 17.04 LTS. You are not able to begin using the WordPress CMS and exploring the features and benefits it provides when operated from a dedicated server. If you had success following this guide and found it helpful, please share it with other individuals that may be setting up their WordPress server.

Top 10 WordPress Themes

WordPress themes provide an easy and effective way to organize content without worrying being a graphic design pro. To use them, you simply choose the theme, then click the “activate this theme” button. The theme will be applied to your content, and you will be free to customize it to fit the feel of your brand.

WordPress Themes

While commercial themes do exist, we’ve focused on free themes for this article. Our top ten picks were selected from the most used designs available, while avoiding the defaults that come with WordPress.

1.Astrid

WordPress Themes: Astrid

This five-star rated theme is sleek and minimal. With customizable color, font, header images, and widgets, Astrid is a versatile theme that lends itself to customer-friendly business sites. Astrid features different templates for services, employees, and other business-related content. It’s completely responsive so you don’t have to worry about how your site looks on different devices.
Astrid >

2. Zerif Lite

WordPress Themes: Zerif Lite

Zerif Lite is the number one rated single-page theme on WordPress. Designed for small business, it’s easy to set up, and offers features such as parallax scrolling and custom content blocks. This theme is based on Bootstrap and is SEO friendly while being completely responsive, and offers a great deal of customization options to fit your company’s needs. There is also a paid version for this theme if you find you need more options.
Zerif Lite >

3. Sydney

WordPress Themes: Sydney

If you’re looking for a professional looking business page, the Sydney theme is a top choice. With simple navigation, clean lines, and a block design, Sydney makes building a business website easy. Sydney is also one of the most highly customizable options out there, offering access to all Google fonts, full color control, layout control, header images, sticky navigation, and more. It’s easy to set up and use which means you can get your site up and running quickly.
Sydney >

4. OnePress

WordPress Themes: OnePress

Another single-page theme, One Press is highly rated and designed with everything you need to quickly build and deploy a professional website. One Press runs on the latest Bootstrap (4), and is SEO-friendly. Offering parallax scrolling, optimized page speed, translation services, and full browser compatibility, One Press is an excellent choice for a user who wants to keep things simple and elegant.
OnePress >

5. Customizr

WordPress Themes: Customizr

As the name suggests, Customizr is built to allow the user full customization options. More advanced than any of the previous themes in this list, Customizr is a fully responsive option that will allow you to flex your content design muscles. It works with most major WordPress plugins, giving you the flexibility to add features to your site. This theme is one of the top-rated and downloaded designs on WordPress.
Custmizr >

6. Minamaze

WordPress Themes: Minamaze

This theme is perfect for both businesses and blogs as it offers responsive layouts, customization options, and an easy-to-use slider. Minamaze’s focus is on placing content so that it can be viewed on any device and any platform without any visual glitches. The base design is simple, with content blocking and a header image, which allows users the ability to quickly deploy a clean, professional-looking site – all without using any coding at all!
Minamaze >

7. Shop Isle

WordPress Themes: Shop Isle

Based on Bootstrap, Shop Isle is just what the name describes – the perfect design for a shopping site. Offering full screen images, parallax effect, and a responsive blog section, this design is minimal and elegant, turning your WordPress site into an optimal online shopping experience. Customers will love how easy it is to navigate and users will love how the clean design highlights the products. This is one of the best free themes for online shopping out there.
Shop Isle >

8. Photolite

WordPress Themes: Photolite

Photolite is designed with photographers and photo-heavy industries (restaurants, photo-blogging, and consultancies) in mind. With a responsive layout and block design, Photolite’s overall look is very clean, drawing attention to the content displayed. Users will enjoy the sleek interface, and while this is a top-notch design, Photolite is not one of the most commonly used photography themes out there. That means that your site will have a more unique look than those that opt for some of the more popular themes.
Photolite >

9. GeneratePress

WordPress Themes: GeneratePress

GeneratePress was designed with speed and efficiency in mind. Its small size allows it to render lightning-fast on browsers, making it perfect for limited hosting resources. Generate Press allows users to keep their costs low while serving a large quantity of traffic. This theme is also SEO optimized, fully responsive, and compatible with most WordPress plugins.
GeneratePress >

10. Nisarg

WordPress Themes: Nisarg

Last but not least is the Nisarg theme. We thought the list would be incomplete without at least one “blogger” theme, and Nisarg is one of the top choices out there. Its minimalistic design coupled with extensive customization features allows Nisarg to reflect the personality of the user. Nisarg can be used for just about anything, but we think it’s best deployed on blogs due to its creative and clean look.
Nisarg >

Conclusions

While we’ve listed the top ten WordPress themes we believe are most likely to be successfully used on a first-time site, this list is in no way comprehensive. The WordPress.org themes database boasts 2217 themes as of today. We invite you to visit their site at https://wordpress.org/themes/ to check out other options and take a look at plugins to make your site even more powerful. If you want to try one of these themes on a new WordPress instance, visit our cloud server lineup and launch an instance in less than 90 seconds.

As a small business, your biggest obstacle on the road to success is getting your product or service out there. You could have the next big thing on your hands, but if you have no way of effectively advertising what you’ve got, then you won’t be able to build your business. That’s where we come in. At GloboTech, we specialize in making you look awesome. We keep on top of the latest innovations and leave no stone unturned when it comes to promoting you. In this post, we’re going to look at how you can take advantage of our easy-to-use WordPress One Click App to get you that much closer to making your first million and giving a super inspiring TED talk. Let’s get started with how to login.

Login to your GloboTech account

This one’s pretty simple. Just login with your username and password over at https://portal.globo.tech

Dashboard Customer Portal

Deploy your WordPress OCA

What is an OCA?

In simple terms, an OCA consists of a regular system image the same as if you were going to provision an Ubuntu server. The cool thing here is that we’ve set up special images that have your favorite applications pre-loaded into them.

The reason why you’re doing this is that it’ll speed up your setup time and make sure that the system has the right dependencies to accomodate the app.

Creating your Instance

You’re definitely going to want a nifty WordPress image if you want to promote yourself. The way you’ll get this is to click on the “Cloud Hosting” link on the left navigation menu that’s on our portal. After that, you’ll click on “Instances.”

If you’ve already got active instances, they’ll show up here. Self-explanatory, but you’ll then want to click on “Create Instance.”

Create Instance

At this point, you’re on the instance creation page. We’ll explain the various fields below.

Instance

Start by setting an instance name.

Wordpress Instance Name

Select a Flavor

While we wish instances were ice cream, flavor means something different here. Flavors are performance packages associated with cloud servers that limit their amount of CPU, RAM and DISK usage. If you’ve got a cozy little blog, you should go with a Popular 2. If you’ve got a bigger operation going, though, you’d be better off with a Popular 3.

If you’re not sure what to go with, it’s best to start small. You can always upgrade later on. Once you’ve picked your flavor, go ahead and click the giant “GET IT” button on the right.

Choose Cloud Package

Select an image

You’ve got to have an image on your cloud server, and this is how you’ll get it. We’re going with a WordPress One Click App here, so you’re going to click on the Application tab. You’ll have a huge list of applications to choose from, but you’ll go with “WordPress.”

Wordpress One Click App

Setup your access preferences

Security is crucial, so here you can either create your instance with a password or an SSH key. Using a password is your best bet.
Instance Password

Select networking options and create your instance

Another of the many things you’ll have to decide on is if you want to use Security Groups. We’ll just leave them disabled now, and you can decide later. After this, just click on “Create your instance” to finish your quest.

Create Instance

Access Credentials

After you’ve completed all of those steps, you’ll get an email with all the info you need to deploy your app on WordPress.

Wordpress Email Confirmation

Test access to your WordPress

Now comes the super exciting part where you test out the instance you’ve made. The simplest way to get there is to visit http://173.209.44.48

Wordpress Website

Login as administrator

Once you’ve found the inevitable mistakes in your first draft of the site, you’ll want to access the admin section to tidy up a bit. First, visit http://173.209.44.48/wp-login.php and then use your handy-dandy credentials to get in. Once you’ve done this, you can confirm that your instance is looking good. If it works for you, let’s get some content in there.

Dashboard

Settings DNS records

Your site’s going to need a domain and DNS records, because a domain name is a heck of a lot more appealing than the string of numbers of an IP address. For instance, let’s use “CatsAndDogsBlog.com.”

You’re going to need two “A” records that’ll sync up your domain with the IP. Without all the techy jargon, you’ll need to make sure that catsanddogsblog.com points towards 173.209.44.48 and that www.catsanddogsblog.com points towards 173.209.44.48.

We know you’re going to be antsy to see if everything’s up and running, but it could take some time for everything to show up on the interwebs. Patience is a virtue, after all.

Edit your profile

Creating a One Click App gives you a random username with no profile. Start off by clicking on “Howdy user7238” and then “Edit My Profile.”

User Profile WordPress

This is where you can setup your super cool profile. You can change your password, nickname, and even your email address.

User Profile

You will land on the profile editing page where you can enter your informations. Once you’re done, click on the “Update Profile” button.

Configure your site informations

Here’s where you make your site pop with descriptions and domains. Hover your mouse over the “Settings” link on the left navigation bar and select “General.”

Wordpress User Setting

This will lead you to a page where you can set the blog title, tagline, and domain. Make sure that the wordPress address and site address match the domain name you’ve chosen, or you will not be a happy camper. After that, press “Save Changes.”

General WordPress

Posting your first article

It’s time to post your first article! Simply login to the admin section by visiting http://catsanddogsblog.com/wp-admin and then hover your mouse over the +NEW link on top and select “Post.”

First Post WordPress

Here’s where you let loose your creative butterfly. You’ve got this. WordPress is pretty cool, as it allows you to add images, links, and other types of content that’ll make you look like the pro you are. Click publish and boom: You’re done.

Delete the default blog post

To get rid of WordPress’s default post, go to “Posts” in your admin dashboard.

Post WordPress

Delete “Hello world!” and then you’re good to go.

Hello World WordPress

From there, go to http://catsanddogsblog.com and bask in the glory of your new site!

Wordpress Website

If you follow all the steps we laid out, you’ll be looking like a pro in no time. So get out there and follow your dreams. You’ve got this!

CMS powerhouse WordPress makes up over 25% of the internet, and that percentage only continues to grow. The millions of websites that use WordPress love it for its flexibility, ease of use, consistent performance, and continual innovative growth. Once you have it set up, you can design and manage your website or blog right from the web. In this Knowledge Base, you will learn how to install WordPress on Ubuntu 14.

Getting Started

To complete this guide, you will need the following:
• 1 Node (Cloud Server or Dedicated Server) with Ubuntu 14 and a LAMP setup previously installed.

If you don't want to go through the whole installation of WordPress on your CentOS 7 server, you can always try our One-Click Apps and get a new WordPress in seconds.

Tutorial

1. Create database and user account.
Wordpress relies on MySQL to manage and store information. We need to create the database. In this case, we will use “wordpress” for the database name.

Log into your MySQL with your root access:

mysql -u root -p

To function, WordPress needs a database that it can control. Now we’ll create the create the database for WordPress:

mysql> CREATE DATABASE wordpress;

You need to create an account with a username and password that will exclusively operate the database you’ve just created. We will use user “wpuser” and password “wppassword” in this example. Create the account:

mysql> CREATE USER wpuser@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'wppassword';

At this point, the database and the user accounts you’ve created aren’t connected, so the next step is to give the privileges to the user to access the database created:

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON wordpress.* TO wpuser@localhost;

To ensure that MySQL knows about the changes just made, we need to confirm and flush all privileges:

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

You can now exit MySQL:

mysql> exit

2. Download and unzip the latest version of WordPress.
It’s important to use the latest version of WordPress, which updates fairly regularly, for security reasons. Download the latest version of WordPress in the /root directory:

cd /root
wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

When the download is complete, we need to unzip to extract the files we need. This will create a directory WordPress in your /root:

tar -zxvf latest.tar.gz

Some PHP modules are needed to run WordPress on your server:

apt-get install php5-gd libssh2-php -y

3.Copy the content of the WordPress directory in the Document root.
Wordpress uses index.php, but your server will automatically use index.html instead if it’s there, so we need to remove the index.html file in the Document root directory:

rm -rf /var/www/html/index.html

For WordPress to work, we now must copy the content of the WordPress directory in the Document root:

cd /root/wordpress
cp * -R /var/www/html/

Apache will sometimes need to interact with the content, so we have to give the ownership to Apache to the Document root directory:

cd /var/www/html/
chown -R www-data. *

So that we will be able to upload files and images to the website, we next create the “uploads” directory to your WordPress and give this directory the ownership:

mkdir /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads
chown -R www-data. /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads/

4. Configure your WordPress
Go in your WordPress installation to the Document root directory:

cd /var/www/html/

For WordPress to function properly, we need to configure it. A sample config file is included with our WordPress directory. Copy the sample config file to wp-config.php:

cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php

The sample wp-config.php file won’t work correctly until we edit it and fill up the information with our database credentials:

nano wp-config.php

// ** MySQL settings - You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define('DB_NAME', 'wordpress');
/** MySQL database username */
define('DB_USER', 'wpuser');
/** MySQL database password */
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'wppassword');

Save and exit.

We’ve already given ownership to Apache, but in order for Apache to actually be able to do rewrites for your WordPress, we need to create the default .htaccess file in the Document root directory:

cd /var/www/html/
nano .htaccess

# BEGIN WordPress

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]

# END WordPress

Save and exit.

5. Complete WordPress installation directly on the web.
http://your_main_ip
• You will have to choose the language you want for your WordPress.
• You need to add your site title.
• You need to choose the username you want for administrator. It’s best to avoid common or generic usernames like “admin” for security reasons.
• Wordpress will automatically create a very strong password, but you can change this to another strong password if you wish.
• You will need to add your email address.

You can now access your WordPress with the username and password set.
http://your_main_ip/wp-admin/

Conclusion

Your WordPress should now be installed and you’re ready to create your website. This basic setup should serve most users well, but some tweaks may be necessary depending on the way you plan to use WordPress. Explore the interface of your new CMS, and you’ll quickly see why so much of the web relies on it. Check out our list of some of the most popular WordPress plugins that will really help take your website to the next level, and take some time to learn about how to protect your WordPress site from attack.

If you liked this KB article, please share it with your friends.

WordPress is one of the main forces in today’s Content Management System (CMS) landscape. Created in 2001 and originally named b2/cafelog, it now powers roughly 25% of the web. In order to understand exactly what WordPress is and how it helps, let’s look at how websites were created when WordPress had its early beginnings. We’ll also investigate just how WordPress changed how sites are created in ways that are taken for granted today.


Content is Key

Creating a website in 2001 was like building a house out of raw materials. Writers would begin by opening a new page in an HTML editor, then would paste in the site’s header and footer. If the page was in a subdirectory on the site, they’d create the necessary structure and set up the web server accordingly.

Likewise, designers would access the site via the primitive FTP protocol. Building a website felt less like writing content, and more like structuring files on a remote computer. If webmasters wanted help managing the site, they’d give others access to the directory on the web server. Permission to change content was managed through the operating system’s underlying, confusing permissions mechanism.

By replacing structuring files with managing content, WordPress revolutionized how websites were created. If a writer wanted to create a new post or page, they need only visit their administrative interface and start writing. Instead of following a filesystem layout, content could be organized in ways that fit the current workflow.

Likewise, WordPress segments site collaborators into more meaningful groups. Writers create and publish content, but lack the ability to make technical changes to WordPress’ underlying configuration. Editors can curate content, make minor changes or unpublish posts. Developers might install new plugins and change themes. WordPress empowers content creators by helping them reason about the site they’re creating, and by limiting their actions to those within their area of responsibility.


Theming and Design

Content is only one aspect of what makes a good site. Layout is also critical to engaging visitors. Placing an article front and center on a page is useless if attention is drawn into adjacent columns that distract from the message. Similarly, calls to action and other important elements must periodically be added and changed based on business requirements and other factors.

Before WordPress and other CMS gained prominence, themes and site designs were difficult to separate from content. Pages were created by opening templates, adding content, and rarely changing how the site looked. If site designers wanted to change a page’s header, add a new column or update a copyright date, they’d do so by individually editing each page they’d ever created.

WordPress separates the theme, which determines how the site looks, from the site’s content itself. It also separates the site’s general appearance from the building blocks that compose it. As such, it is possible to completely redesign a site with minimal impact on its pages and posts.

Separating content from design has drastically simplified web-based publishing. A rich ecosystem of WordPress professionals has arisen, and the aspiring blogger or business owner can select from any one of thousands of themes for any modern site. Likewise, themes can be created entirely from scratch. If someone can imagine a website, it can be designed and published on WordPress.


Plugins: Beyond the Basics

While WordPress brought compelling changes to how websites were created, it would not have lasted for longer than a decade without the ability to expand. Plugins empower WordPress to gain new capabilities, enhance existing features, and even to experiment with entirely new ways of managing web content.

The web of 2001 was significantly different than today’s social networks, blogs, sharing models and promotional strategies. Thanks to plugins, WordPress keeps up without losing its stride. WordPress sites can integrate with Twitter for promotion and metrics, store comments on Disqus, and tie into analytics services for rich feedback on website visitors.

WordPress plugins also enable it to serve uses more sophisticated than publishing posts to websites. BuddyPress transforms it into a full social network with activity streams, profiles, user groups and messaging. Likewise, bbPress enables its use as a forum. Creators of membership sites with subscription content would be well served by the Membership 2 plugin. Thousands of available plugins make WordPress one of the best choices for just about any modern website.


Continuing Innovation

After fifteen years, one might think that WordPress has solved all of the problems it launched to fix. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

In late 2015, WordPress announced its new administrative interface called Calypso. The goal was to breathe new excitement into WordPress by addressing many of the issues faced by users of the platform.

For instance, many WordPress users manage large numbers of distinct sites. Calypso supports multiple WordPress instances right out of the box. With access to Calypso, WordPress content creators and designers can manage all of their sites from a single place.

Calypso is also built for speed. Much of the WordPress architecture was designed when the web was more transactional, and changes were served up after submitting a form or clicking Refresh. In contrast, Calypso uses WordPress’ APIs more directly, providing faster access to WordPress internals.

Today’s web is ubiquitous, and content creators must be empowered to create and update using everything from the phone to the desktop. Calypso employs modern responsive web design techniques, transforming WordPress’ venerable administrative interface into one that can keep up with the rapidly changing modern web.


Conclusion

Over the past decade, WordPress changed how websites are created and designed. These advancements ushered in an entire ecosystem of professional designers and developers who, thanks to its extensibility, have helped WordPress to grow alongside the web. Today, its boundaries are still being pushed in ways that keep it relevant and competitive. Anyone wishing to build a compelling, rich website would do well to consider what WordPress has to offer.

WordPress’ web-based installer and administrative interface is powerful, letting you perform most essential tasks from the comfort of your browser. Even so, it is easy to render this system difficult or impossible to use in a number of ways. One such is forgetting your administrative password, losing access to your administrative email address, or breaking the server such that it can no longer send outbound email so you can recover lost credentials. If any of these things happens to you, it is possible to change these configuration values directly in the database using the Linux command line.

Getting Started

To complete this guide, you will need the following:
• 1 Node (Cloud Server or Dedicated Server) with any Linux distribution installed.
• WordPress previously installed.

While we’ll work to preserve things should anything go wrong, realize that your login credentials will be changed if you follow these steps, so take appropriate precautions so you can log in later.

Tutorial

Before we begin, let’s back up your WordPress database. These steps should be safe to perform, but having a backup is a good practice to follow before performing any operations on the database layer.

mysqldump -u root -p wpdatabase > /root/wpdatabase.sql

Start by accessing the MySQL console. You’ll be prompted for your MySQL root password.

mysql -u root -p

At the console, access your WordPress database. From this point onward, any commands you send will run on this database.

use wpdatabase;

We’ll now verify your user details to ensure that we know which records to update later.

SELECT ID, user_login, user_pass FROM wp_users;

Next we’ll manually update your administrator password. You can update your email address and password independently, depending on which task you need to perform.

UPDATE `wp_users` SET `user_pass` = MD5('new_password_here') WHERE `wp_users`.`user_login` = "admin";

Now we’ll update your administrative email address. (optional)

UPDATE `wp_users` SET `user_email` = "new@email_address.tld" WHERE `wp_users`.`user_login` = "admin";

At this point you’ve reset your necessary login credentials. You can now successfully log in with the email address and password you’ve just configured.

Conclusion

WordPress’ web interface is usually more than capable. If it ever fails you, though, then it is useful to fall back on the MySQL console to make necessary configuration changes. If this guide was helpful to you, kindly share it with others who may also be interested.

WordPress (WP) is ubiquitous in the hosting world and with thousands of plug-ins and customization, it pretty much allows you to do anything you want.  It is not only easy to use but easy to install as well.  By the end of this tutorial you will have your own Ubuntu server running WP.

Getting Started

To complete this guide, you will need the following:
• 1 Node (Cloud Server or Dedicated Server) with Ubuntu 16.04 and a LAMP setup previously installed.

If you need to learn how to install LAMP on Ubuntu 16 visit our tutorial on it. Because of Ubuntu 16, PHP7 is now the standard version and is reflected in this tutorial.

If you don't want to go through the whole installation of WordPress on your CentOS 7 server, you can always try our One-Click Apps and get a new WordPress in seconds.

Let’s Start with MySQL

First we’ll create WordPress’ database. In these examples we’ll use “wordpress” as the database name, “wpuser” for the user and “wppassword” as the password. We recommend that you change the username and password to something unique and strong.  We will need to access MySQL with your database root credentials:

mysql -u root -p

Now, create the database where your WP will store its content.

CREATE DATABASE wordpress;

We now need a user and password for the database. These credentials are for MySQL only, and are not how you will access your site in later steps.

CREATE USER 'wpuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'wppassword';

The created credentials now need the privileges necessary to update the database. We’ll assign those here.
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON wordpress.* TO 'wpuser'@'localhost';

We’ve created the privileges, but they must now be confirmed and saved to the database in order to take effect.
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Great, you’ve successfully set up the database. Let’s exit MySQL and begin setting up WordPress’ PHP scripts.
exit

Installing WordPress

We will start by downloading the latest WordPress packages which ensure you will have the latest code, security updates or goodies. Fortunately, the latest download is stored at a permanent URL that is easy to retrieve.

cd /root
wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

When complete, we can unzip the file. This will create a directory in which we’ll need to perform a few steps.

tar -zxvf latest.tar.gz

WordPress requires some extra PHP modules to be install on your ubuntu 16 server. Let’s install and activate them.

apt-get install php-gd php-ssh2 -y

All necessary PHP modules are now available and active. We will need to restart Apache to apply the changes.

systemctl restart httpd.service

We’re now ready to start setting up WordPress’ scripts to run under Apache. Let’s place them in Apache’s document root so it knows where to find them.

cd wordpress
cp * -R /var/www/html/

Next we need an uploads directory, where any content uploaded by users and administrators is stored.

mkdir /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads
chmod 775 /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads

Make sure to give  Apache permission to read and write to its document root. This will enable plugin installation and upgrades.

chown -R apache. /var/www/html/*

The WP files are now in place, so next we’ll need to tell it how to connect to the database. We’ll do that by entering the root directory.

cd /var/www/html/

Take a backup of the default configuration in case you make any mistakes.

cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php

It’s now time to set the database credentials. Do so by editing the wp-config.php file, replacing “wpuser” and “wppassword” with the database user and password set up in previous steps.

nano wp-config.php

Edit the file as following:
// ** MySQL settings - You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define('DB_NAME', 'wordpress');
/** MySQL database username */
define('DB_USER', 'wpuser');
/** MySQL database password */
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'wppassword');

Save the file. You’ve just recorded database access credentials in a file that can be accessed over the web. To prevent that, let’s edit the .htaccess file to block this plus a few other common attacks.

nano /var/www/html/.htaccess

Edit the file as following:
# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

We’re almost done. Save the file, and continue the installation by accessing the web-based installer. Visit http://your_main_ip to start the process.

First, select your default language. Next, set a site title. Set an administrative username, a strong password and enter your email address. Don’t choose usernames like “admin,” “webmaster” or “root” that an attacker might guess.

Always be sure to use a strong password.

You can now access your site with the username and password you just entered. Simply visit http://your_main_ip and start adding content!

Conclusion

You are now running WordPress on the latest LTS version of Ubuntu! Make sure to upkeep your server and your WP in the future and you will be able to enjoy all the current and new WordPress. If this guide was helpful to you, kindly share it with others who may also be interested.

WordPress (WP) is one of the most popular content management system, powering an estimated 25% of the web. Part of this popularity stems from its ease of installation. If you’re looking to launch it on your CentOS 7 server, you’ve come to the right place.

Getting Started with WordPress

To complete this guide, you will need the following:
• 1 Node (Cloud Server or Dedicated Server) with CentOS 7 and a LAMP setup previously installed.

If you don't want to go through the whole installation of WordPress on your CentOS 7 server, you can always try our One-Click Apps and get a new WordPress in seconds.

Tutorial

Let’s get started. First we’ll create WordPress’ database. In these examples we’ll use “wordpress” as the database name, “wpuser” for the user and “wppassword” as the password. Please change the username and password to something unique and strong, otherwise anyone who reads this tutorial will know how to access your database. First, access MariaDB with your database root credentials:

mysql -u root -p

Next, let’s create the database where WP will store its content.

MariaDB > CREATE DATABASE wordpress;

We now need a user and password for the database. These credentials are for MariaDB only, and are not how you will access your site in later steps.

MariaDB > CREATE USER 'wpuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'wppassword';

The created credentials now need the privileges necessary to update the database. We’ll assign those here.
MariaDB > GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON wordpress.* TO 'wpuser'@'localhost';

We’ve created the privileges, but they must now be confirmed and saved to the database in order to take effect.
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Great, you’ve successfully set up the database. Let’s exit and begin setting up WordPress’ PHP scripts.
MariaDB > exit

Start by retrieving the latest distribution. Fortunately, the latest download is stored at a permanent URL that is easy to retrieve.

cd /root
wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

Now we’ll unzip the file. This will create a WordPress directory in which we’ll need to perform a few steps.

tar -zxvf latest.tar.gz

WordPress requires a few non-standard PHP modules that aren’t enabled by default in CentOS. Let’s install and activate them.

yum install php-gd php-mbstring

All necessary PHP modules are now available and active, but Apache needs to be restarted to take advantage of the new capabilities.

systemctl restart httpd.service

Great. We’re now ready to start setting up WordPress’ scripts to run under Apache. Let’s place them in Apache’s document root so it knows where to find them.

cd wordpress
cp * -R /var/www/html/

Next we need an uploads directory, where any content uploaded by users and administrators is stored.

mkdir /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads
chmod 775 /var/www/html/wp-content/uploads

Let’s now give Apache permission to read and write to its document root. This will enable plugin installation and upgrades.

chown -R apache. /var/www/html/*

The WP files are now in place, so next we’ll need to tell it how to connect to the database. We’ll do that by entering the root directory.

cd /var/www/html/

Take a backup of the default configuration in case you make any mistakes.

cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php

It’s now time to set the database credentials. Do so by editing the wp-config.php file, replacing “wpuser” and “wppassword” with the database user and password set up in previous steps.

nano wp-config.php
// ** MySQL settings - You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define('DB_NAME', 'wordpress');
/** MySQL database username */
define('DB_USER', 'wpuser');
/** MySQL database password */
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'wppassword');

Save the file. You’ve just recorded database access credentials in a file that can be accessed over the web. To prevent that, let’s edit the .htaccess file to block this plus a few other common attacks.

cd /var/www/html/
nano .htaccess

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

We’re almost done. Save the file, and continue the installation by accessing WordPress’ web-based installer. Visit http://your_main_ip to start the process.

First, select your default language. Next, set a site title. Set an administrative username, a strong password and enter your email address. Don’t choose usernames like “admin,” “webmaster” or “root” that an attacker might guess. Also be sure to use a strong password.

You can now access your site with the username and password you just entered. Simply visit http://your_main_ip and start adding content!

Conclusion

Congratulations! You’ve gone from a pristine new server to a sophisticated website hosting platform in just a few minutes of work. Enjoy adding posts and pages to your brand new site. If this guide was helpful to you, kindly share it with others who may also be interested.

What Is WordPress?

Wordpress logoLooking to create a blog? WordPress is a website Content Management System (CMS) written in PHP that drives what a blog looks like, how users interact with it, and what you do with that blog. It is the most popular CMS out there for bloggers. When you decide to create your own blog, you can either download the software from WordPress.org and host the blog on your servers or create a blog on WordPress.com and not have to worry about software or server maintenance. (more…)

Since the beginning of April 2013, there has been a significant increase of break-in attempts of unsecured Blogs powered by WordPress. By doing brute force attacks, the culprits are able to access the admin panel of WordPress who are using lower password strength. It is strongly recommended to always use a very strong password using a minimum of 12 characters with upper and lower cases and using specials characters. You can also use a random password generator as it is not recommend to use passwords that consist of dictionary words.
(more…)